Natasha Richardson’s death and what you should know about brain injuries


This story about Natasha Richardson‘s death is from 2009 but relevant to understanding the nature of brain injuries. What appeared to be a fall in the snow on a bunny skiing slope ended up with Natasha’s untimely passing. Please scroll down to read more.

================

Natasha Richardson’s death and what you should know about brain injuries

By Susan Perry | 03/19/09
Natasha Richardson

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Natasha Richardson at a Metropolitan Museum of
Art Costume Institute Gala in New York last year.

Initial reports of Natasha Richardson’s tragic skiing accident, which led to her death yesterday, offered two bits of information that had many people perplexed.

First, the actress’ fall had been onto the snow-covered ground. She hadn’t run into a hard upright object, like a tree, a building, or even another skier.

And second, Richardson had walked away from the accident seemingly unscathed. She was even heard joking about her fall. Not until an hour or so later, when she started having headaches, did the seriousness of the situation become apparent.

How can that be? How can someone tumble down a beginner’s ski slope, appear fine, and yet within hours be fighting for her life in a hospital’s ICU?”Natasha Richardson’s example sadly shows how devastating an innocuous brain injury can be,” says David King, executive director of the Brain Injury Association of Minnesota.

A major health problem
Many traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) — injuries severe enough to disrupt how the brain functions—have such harmless-appearing beginnings. Symptoms, such as headache, nausea, ringing in the ears, impaired vision, irritability and confusion, may take some time to develop. Or they may be ignored until they become severe — and life threatening.

TBIs are much more common than most people think. In the United States, one occurs every 15 seconds, and every five minutes someone dies from such an injury. Although people with TBIs can recover, particularly if they receive medical treatment early enough, many experience lasting and life-altering impairments.

Source: click to read more…

http://www.minnpost.com/politics-policy/2009/03/natasha-richardsons-death-and-what-you-should-know-about-brain-injuries

5 responses to “Natasha Richardson’s death and what you should know about brain injuries

  1. Great article about TBI. Early treatment is key, but that rarely occurs. This site is an excellent resource.

    • Thanks, Edie! I just left a message for you. You should join us on the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) page on facebook. Your experience and knowledge would benefit a lot of people.

    • Thanks — I hope all is well with you. I presumed to connect you with a tBI survivor that could benefit from your help. I will send you a private message.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s